Molly's Blog

Molly Templeton is the arts and music editor for Eugene Weekly.

Best. Movie. Ever.

That? IS TOTALLY MY CAT.

(By Simon Tofield, whose work you can see here.)

PS. Heroes sucked way less this week! More on that later.

Dammit! I had a whole post written and then I ... um ... well, I blew it. Whoops. What it said, in essence, was that I read this neat story over on Pitchfork about the Glass Casters Union, which has collected artwork from a buncha indie rock bands (mmm, new Band of Horses) and created Christmas ornaments with it - and they're selling the ornaments for charity. Currently, their creations are only available through a handful of eBay auctions and via a few of the bands, but there will be more soon. And the really cool thing? The Glass Casters Union is here in Eugene! Those auctions benefit Aurora Glass, and the Union lists, as its interests, veggie burritos from the likes of Burrito Boy. Now how did a bunch of Eugeneans put this awesome plan into action? We'll have to find out.

To those, what, two? maybe? people who check for Heroes posts: Sorry! It is still Beast of Eugene time. Blogging falls by the wayside. It's sad. I like blogging. But there it goes ...

You know what I don't like, though? Stupid things happening on my "favorite" show. (I keep forgetting to watch Grey's. I completely forgot to watch Private Practice and/or Pushing Daisies, both of which I also wanted to recap. Bionic Woman was silly; Reaper can't sustain the whole hour. Plz more America's Next Top Model now? Does that show even air at a regular time or am I just lucky whenever I stumble across it?) To this season of Heroes, I give a big W. T. F., for the most part. Shall we discuss?

Spoilers through episode three after the jump! So make with the clicky...

Bad Molly: I couldn't, for some reason, stop talking during this episode. What's that? Who's he talking about? Isn't that related to X, Y and/or Z? What did Mr. Bennett mean by that? Etc., etc., etc. No wonder my boyfriend started doing laundry instead of watching with me. Sorry, yo.

But I did watch, all the same, and while this week's recap will probably not be as in-depth as last, I'm still going to natter on for awhile, because that is what blogs are for. So: Episode 2: "Lizards," aka The One In Which Claire Does Dumb Things. As always, after the jump there are spoilers for the story so far!

That sound you hear is me squealing with joy at this bit of news, from Publishers Weekly:

Fantasy author Garth Nix has sold North American rights to three new YA books to Ruth Katcher at HarperCollins Children’s via agent Jill Grinberg, who made the seven-figure deal. The three books include a prequel and a sequel to Nix’s Abhorsen YA fantasy trilogy

If you like fantasy at all, you really ought to read the Abhorsen series, which begins with the amazing Sabriel. (If you were to Google me, you would find a quote about this book from me in a PW piece about very un-put-downable books. No joke.)

Sorry for the lack of blogging. Ballots, you know, they take a lot of time. But things are barreling forward! And blogging shall return to the top of my to-do list shortly.

Realistically, I'm not sure why I was so damn excited for the return of Heroes, even though it was last year's best new show despite having (apparently unknowingly) borrowed rather heavily from X-Men mythos. You've got your Rogue, your Wolverine, your Shadowcat — and, amusingly, all the genders are reversed!

I love it. But I hated season one's finale with a fiery, burning passion. It didn't make sense. It cut out the most interesting characters from the final battle — what there was of that. It pretended to kill off one of my favorite characters in a totally unbelievable way that left not an iota of suspense as to whether he'd be returning this year. It was bad.

"Four Months Later," season two's premiere, isn't that bad. But it's a little weak all the same. 'Ware spoilers after the jump!

Eugene's own Fast Computers have the Song of the Day on NPR with "Sweden Hasn't Changed, You Have" which is, come to think of it, my favorite FC song, too (though in my head the title lacks the last two words). Sure, they spelled Peter's last name incorrectly, but what's a little misspelling in the face of good publicity? Caroline Evans writes, "The melody itself is powerful, haunting and stark, but it also seems organic and natural, a perfect opening to one of the year's most satisfying releases." Sweet.

For more on the FC, you might peruse their tour diary entries on Willamette Week's Local Cut blog. Hey, why didn't we think of that?

Oh, I know: Local Cut has, um, readers.

(Three cheers to the guy who linked to one of my posts! You give me hope, sir.)

Super cool authors + imaginary playlists (alas, without links) = some of the coolest blog-based stuff I've read in ages: the New York Times' "Living With Music" series.

Apologies to all of you who're rolling your eyes; as established this morning, if it's not about movies, music or books, then everyone else knows about it before me. And sometimes they all know about it first even when it IS about these things.

(Tied for coolest blog-based stuff I've read in ages is David Edelstein's blog over at New York magazine, which also, we discovered this morning, has an awesome theater critic who rivals Anthony Lane for pure sleek cleverness in his sentences. I don't always agree with Edelstein — for one example, check his blog post about Sideways — but I very often like the way he says things.)

• Bacon Salt "is a zero calorie, vegetarian, Kosher certified seasoning salt that makes everything taste like real bacon." Seriously? Gimme some. Let me try it.

• Newsflash: Publishers sometimes reject things that go on to be classics! OK, all sarcasm aside, it's true, and the rejections quoted in this story make me want to go paw through the Knopf archives discussed in the story. Rejection letters — any kind of editorial letters, really — are always fascinating, both for what they say and what they don't say, and for the examination of the editing and writing process. And for the simple fact that sometimes people make mistakes, but other times, they pass on things because the time or the publisher isn't right. If someone other than Scholastic had published Harry Potter, would it still be a phenomenon? I want to think so, but it doesn't always work that way.

• Still on the topic of books, the Booker Prize list has been narrowed to the shortlist. Surprise! Ian McEwan is still on it! I need to read that book. And re-read the wonderful, gorgeous Atonement before I have to arm-wrestle Jason for the right to review December's film adaptation.

• How to be a good restaurant patron: Don't say any of these things. I heart Waiter Rant.

• Today's aggravating news: Southwest Airlines would like to tell you how to dress.

• Today's not-that-surprising news that's probably only of interest to my former-New Yorker self: The Village Voice reports on a study showing that "Four years later, relatively healthy and seemingly resilient 9/11 witnesses near the twin towers—people who witnessed the events with their own eyes—were more sensitive to certain emotional stimuli than people several miles away who learned of the events secondhand."

• And to counter that sad reminder, I leave you with today's dose of awesomeness: Brian K. Vaughan and Joss Whedon, together! I've been saving this one ’til the end of the day. Dessert, if you will.

Marry Our Daughter: real or fake?

From the FAQ: "But in the unhappy event that your marriage doesn’t work out, then whatever conditions have been negotiated between the husband and the wife’s family will apply." (Emphasis mine.)

This is just too easy a target. Seriously.

(Three cheers to Jef for the disturbing, though probably not real, link.)

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