Molly Templeton's blog

As promised, here's the second of a series of longer Q&As with the designers featured in this week's fashion issue. More to come!


SHADY LADY
by Annie Rupp, 31

You, your card says, focus on lingerie, swimwear and parasols. Can you talk about that a little bit?
I started making organic underwear when my daughter potty-trained really young. So I just started making really cute little kids’ underwear and that quickly expanded into adult underwear, and a lot of organic, bamboo cotton. Then I started getting involved with some stretch lace, and then I bought some gold lamé, and everyone just went crazy when I started making swimsuits. I’ve been having a really hard time like getting an inventory, which has been awesome. I just started this spring, in April. I did the fashion show this — er, I wasn't in the fashion show, but I vended some stuff and it was super fun.

So how do you describe your style?
The swimsuits are kind of a little pinup girl, a little maybe shiny Lycra edgy but kind of something that you can wear and be active in but still look super cute. I do a lot of custom stuff, and custom costumes for Burning Man.

And then the parasols — that was my original idea, like I’m gonna customize parasols, and then I started doing the underwear too. So the parasols, right now, I’m just doing monogram stuff, or if people want — like, I’m doing a bunch of Shady Lady parasols for the fashion show.

(Read more...)

As promised, here's the first of a series of longer Q&As with the designers featured in this week's fashion issue. More to come!


JAUNTY DESIGNS
by Moria Wheeler, 24

What kind of clothes do you focus on?
I focus on clothes mostly for 16-mid-20some girls. Really bright colors, flashy patterns — clothes that are fun.

How long have you been designing clothes?
Since 2006.

Have you been selling stuff the whole time?
I think I started probably a year after that putting my stuff on consignment at Deluxe and later, when Kitsch evolved, at Kitsch.

Do you have a day job?
No. I’ve been going to school on and off. I’m not currently in classes this semester, but I do go to school, too.

Does designing earn enough to make a living?
Not enough to make a living but enough to have, I guess, pocket money, to be able to do things you want to do.

(Read more...)

You could — and should — go see Winter's Bone at the Bijou. But this weekend there's an extra-special reason to get over to the theater: Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro's incredible, whimsical, strange, dark and lovely The City of Lost Children is playing. Why? "Just a wild hair," says the Bijou's Louise Thomas. Works for me.

I've lost track of how many times I've seen this movie, and yet I still fail at a quick summary: In a bizarre city, One (Ron Perlman) and a beautiful little urchin named Miette (Judith Vittet) set out to find One's little brother, who's been kidnapped by a scientist who employs a small army of Dominique Pinons to help him study dreams in hopes of stopping the aging process? That doesn't even begin to cover it.

(Click here for a perfectly mystifying trailer.)

Jeunet (sans Caro) has a new film coming out soon, but Micmacs, while moderately charming, has nothing on City. Go, go, go!

Hot on the heels of last weekend's Bite of Eugene — at which we hear Rabbit Bistro chef Gabriel Gil won the Iron Chef competition — comes a smaller but still charming way to try a variety of Eugene eats: Ninkasi's Carts & Cold One Cookoff. All we know is what's on that flyer, but as frequent consumers of Eugene's food cart offerings, we can't help but be intrigued by the chance to eat from lots of carts at once while sipping pints on Ninkasi's shiny new patio. It's kind of like the super Kesey Plaza food cart pod — but, y'know, with beer.

Snack on stuff from Devour, Chick'n Shack, Eddo Buger, Casa de Dilla, The Nosh Pit, Bianacala Pork Growers and more from 5-8 pm Sunday, Aug. 1, at Ninkasi Brewing (272 Van Buren). Proceeds benefit the School Garden Project, Farm to School and the Terra Madre Network.

The really, really, good (via everyone and their mother on Twitter):



The iffy, shiny, what-the-fuck-is-going-on-here? bad (via Cinematical):

(Can someone please put my annoyed mind at ease by identifying the unnecessarily epic and swoopy music toward the end?)


... and the ever so aptly named weird. If this looks like your kind of thing? It probably is.



The Good the Bad the Weird opens tomorrow at the Bijou. Voyage of the Dawn Treader comes out December 10. And Scott Pilgrim, which I've been looking forward to for two years, is out Aug. 13. Please don't disappoint me, Edgar Wright.

Via Portland Mercury via Towleroad via Buzzfeed via OH PLEASE MAKE IT STOP.

Have you got a few ideas about how this country ought to be run? Maybe a notion as to what "American values" really means, or how the government can work toward American prosperity?

The Republicans would like to hear from you. Just as soon as they can get their website sorted out. At the moment, it tells me that many Americans are speaking out. Can I wait a moment, then try again?

You bet I can. Because America is speaking out, and it has a sense of humor.

Let's have the Washington Post's Dana Milbank explain what America Speaking Out, the Repubbers' new website, is all about:

Republicans want to take over the House in the fall, but there's a problem: They don't have an agenda.

So on Tuesday, they set out to resolve that shortcoming. They announced that they would solicit suggestions on the Internet, then have members of the public give the ideas a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down. Call it the "Dancing With the Stars" model of public policy.

Later in Millbank's piece — which you really should read; his carefully sustained tone is a thing of sly beauty — Rep. Peter Roskam (Ill.) explains that his party's shiny new site "has cutting-edge technology" and "a winsome design that is easy for people to interact with." And sure, some of those folks interacting with the site are very sincere in their suggestions. Make Congress have the same health care as the rest of us. Don't let politicians vote to give themselves raises. Stop bickering. "I have two words for you: Palin/Beck 2012."

I'm still not sure whether to take that one seriously. But what do the less predictable posters want from this great country?

"Pomegranates are a trend whose time has past," says a poster whose suggestion is currently getting more thumbs-up than thumbs-down votes.

"TAX EXCLAMATION MARKS!!! AND CAPITAL LETTERS!!! AND SENTENCE FRAGMENTS!!!" suggests a person with a creative idea about how to deal with budget issues. Some posters get down to truly pressing questions ("Jelly or jam? I like jelly cause of no seeds") and important details ("Make it illegal for your friend to send you a Facebook message about that brown cow, holy clap, I've seen that thing like fifty times, no exaggeration, no one cares about your farm, Jennifer").

America Speaking Out is currently crashing again, meaning I can't pull more choice quotes for you — but the thing is, fellow Americans, I trust you can find some beauts yourself. Do tell us what you turn up. But let me leave you with one last pearl of wisdom:

"Dolphins are not good role models because they live in groups, just like communists."

At the Oregon and Washington Society of Professional Journalists' annual awards banquet on Saturday, EW picked up a handful of nifty certificates. While SPJ has the year's award recipients listed on a nifty PDF, we thought it might be helpful — or at least potentially interesting to one or two people — to give a quick rundown with handy-dandy links.

Second place, special section
The State of Suds

Third place, special section
Oregon Bach Festival 2009

Second place, criticism
"A Red Hot Mess: 'China Design Now' at the Portland Art Museum mostly fails to charm" by Suzi Steffen

Third place, criticism
"Defining Her Future: Carey Mulligan shines in an unsentimental film" by Molly Templeton

Second place, education reporting
"Retaliation? Did the UO fire a professor for alleging racism?" by Camilla Mortensen

Yeah, yeah, we didn't get any firsties. We'll try harder. And maybe shake our puny fists in admiration at Willamette Week's impressive restaurant guide in the meantime.

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